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Materials Recycling World
27 June 2008

View all stories from this issue.

  • Audit emphasised MRFs huge carbon footprint, says councillor

    An angry Camden councillor has rejected interpretations of an audit that suggested commingled collections were more efficient than kerbside sort (MRW June 24).The audit examined and compared the environmental impacts of the current commingled system (2006/07) with a kerbside sort scheme used in 2005/06.Councillor and eco champion Alexis Rowell said the audit revealed that materials recycling facilities (MRF), where commingled recyclates are sorted, have a huge carbon f
  • Closed loop food grade plastic recycling plant opens

    The UKs first food grade plastics recycling facility has been opened in Dagenham, London, by Closed Loop Recycling (CLR). At the plant, 35,000 tonnes of PET and HDPE plastic bottles will be recycled back into raw food grade material ready to use in new food and drinks packaging. Companies already signed up to use it include Coca-Cola Enterprises, Marks & Spencer, Nampak Plastics Europe and Solo cup.CLR managing director Chris Dow said that the plant was evidence that t
  • Commingled collections work in Camden, finds audit

    Camden Councils current commingled service is more efficient than a kerbside sort scheme it used in 2005/06, according to an independent audit it commissioned.However, the performance of the materials recycling facility (MRF) where the collected materials are sorted was found to be less efficient.A Camden Council spokeswoman said: The audit was undertaken last year to ensure we had a better understanding of our kerbside recycling service in the context of performance,
  • Directive requires high quality recycling

    High quality recycling provisions have been included in revisions to the waste framework directive.Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs waste regulation policy manager John MacIntyre at the East Meets Waste conference in Cambridge demonstrated what the revisions may require and how the UK intends to interpret it.He showed the key amendment that states:"Members States shall take measures to promote high quality recycling and to this end t
  • Enterprise-Liverpool wins City's collection contract

    Liverpool City Council has awarded Enterprise-Liverpool a multi-million pound seven year contract for kerbside collection in an effort to boost recycling rates. The bid-winning company is a partnership between Liverpool City Council and infrastructure manager Enterprise. It will take over from Veolia Environmental Services which has held the contract since 1991.In the past year the council has revamped its recycling system to drive up collection rates. A council spokes
  • EU waste prevention targets next on agenda

    A Member of the European Parliament has warned that waste prevention targets will be next on the European Union's (EU) agenda following recent revisions to the Waste Framework Directive.Last week, the European Parliament passed the amendments to the directive, but controversially did not include targets on waste prevention as part of a compromise agreement to enable the new framework to move further towards being fully adopted by the EU and national governments.However, R
  • EU's 50% recycling target doesn't include green waste

    Green waste will not count towards the 50% target for municipal waste as set out in the revisions to the European Waste Framework Directive, according to a senior Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) official.Waste regulation policy manager John MacIntyre, speaking at the East Meets Waste conference in Cambridge, said that the target for recycling and re-use of municipal waste in the current version of the revisions only applied to metal, glass, paper a
  • Greenstar buys Leicester Paper Processors

    Waste management company Greenstar has bought Leicester Paper Processors, a commercial recycling business, to increase its network of materials recycling facilities (MRFs).Leicester Paper Processors MRF processes 45,000 tonnes of recyclables a year and is part of Greenstars plans to develop a series of super MRFs near major urban centres. These super MRFs will link to a feeder spine of smaller MRFs, to process commingled and source-separated materials.With this acquisi
  • Microchips will help cut council tax

    Local authorities which use microchips in bins are forward thinking and will save residents paying a lot of money on their council tax, according to a bin identification provider.Advanced Manufacturing and Control Systems (AMCS UK) is a supplier of bin identification solutions to the waste management and recycling industry in Ireland and the UK.Business development manager Austin Ryan said: A lot of local authorities are heavily criticised for being forward thinking bu
  • Pay dispute could bring collections strike

    Bin men and women have voted to support industrial action in a dispute over pay, which could mean strikes and collection service disruption across the UK.Members of trade union Unison in England, Wales and Northern Ireland voted for action in response to a 2.45% pay offer, which is below inflation at 3.3%. Scottish members will also be voting on industrial action shortly.The pay dispute covers many sectors in local government including social workers, housing benefit w
  • Reduction in the number of waste firms predicted

    The number of waste companies in the UK is expected to fall by a fifth over the next three years, according to financial consultant Grant Thornton.In its Waste Sector Mergers and Acquisitions report, the company said reductions would be caused by consolidation of existing companies and the failure of others. However, the health of the sector is not in doubt as consolidation is being driven in part by an increased interest in waste firms from trade buyers and private eq
  • Straight helps Oldham with its food waste

    Oldham Council is expanding its food waste collection trial, in a bid to increase recycling rates, with the help of waste management firm Straight.The local authority is set to rollout more than 80,000 of Straights 23 litre kerbside caddies. Residents can put their food waste inside the caddies.The council will initially distribute 20,000 of the containers in August. A further 20,000 caddies will be delivered in three separate phases over the course of 12 months.Was
  • Trio makes liquid fuel from landfill gas

    The first commercially produced liquid fuel from landfill gas has been announced by Gasrec, BOC and Sita UK.Liquid Biomethane (LBM), which has been produced by the Gasrec plant at Sitas Albury landfill site in Surrey, could be a future alternative to petrol.As well as being a renewable fuel, developers said using LBM instead of petrol could save as much as 70% in CO2 emissions. It can be used in vehicles that already use compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas.
  • WRAP's Ward has concerns over targets

    New European Union targets were described as "challenging" by Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP) director of local government services Phillip Ward.He said that a 50% average recycling rate for paper, metal, plastic and glass would require "very high participation rates and commitment from individual households."But he also warned that this would not be easy:"This will be hard to achieve frankly and will require a huge change in mindset. There are lots

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