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Construction starts on innovative £15m waste treatment facility

Organic Waste Management has started work on its innovative £15 million solid waste treatment facility in Cheshire.

The mechanical biological treatment plant will serve Manchesters industrial commercial market to divert 180,000 tonnes of waste from landfill.

The plant is the first in the UK to use the Bedminster technology to recover the hard recyclables and convert the residue to compost.

OWM chairman Mike Brookes said: The technology is proven at scale on the waste types we are targeting and we know that we can build and operate the plant at a cost very competitive with landfill.

We have some uncommitted capacity at the plant at present and plan to talk to local authorities who may need outlets for collected food waste as well as mixed residual waste.

The Bedminster technology utilises a large rotating drum, which is based on a patented cement kiln design, to separate the fractions of the waste. The waste is put in the drum, which turns one revolution per minute and after two days the waste is separated.

The process, which has been operating in North America and Australia for 30 years, produces unrestricted use class one compost from mixed municipal waste.

Bedminster Technology Chief executive Pearce OKane said: As the Bedminster MBT technology extracts more than 95 per cent of the biodegradable waste input, this means we are able to guarantee local authorities that we can meet their diversion from landfill requirements beyond 2020 at no premium to the tax payer, as well as provide a cost effective added value service to the commercial and industrial sectors.

The plant is situated close to the A56 in Northwich.
The plant is the first in the UK to use the Bedminster technology to recover the hard recyclables and convert the residue to compost.
OWM chairman Mike Brookes said: The technology is proven at scale on the waste types we are targeting and we know that we can build and operate the plant at a cost very competitive with landfill.
We have some uncommitted capacity at the plant at present and plan to talk to local authorities who may need outlets for collected food waste as well as mixed residual waste.
The Bedminster technology utilises a large rotating drum, which is based on a patented cement kiln design, to separate the fractions of the waste. The waste is put in the drum, which turns one revolution per minute and after two days the waste is separated.
The process, which has been operating in North America and Australia for 30 years, produces unrestricted use class one compost from mixed municipal waste.
Bedminster Technology Chief executive Pearce OKane said: As the Bedminster MBT technology extracts more than 95 per cent of the biodegradable waste input, this means we are able to guarantee local authorities that we can meet their diversion from landfill requirements beyond 2020 at no premium to the tax payer, as well as provide a cost effective added value service to the commercial and industrial sectors.
The plant is situated close to the A56 in Northwich.

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