Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of MRW, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Key to deliver zero waste outlined

Priorities to help Scotland achieve its ambitious zero waste targets are outlined in a new report.

The Scottish Environmental Services Association’s (SESA) Waste to Resource: the Pathway to Zero Waste report outlines recommendations for the industry to be able invest in the required services and infrastructure to meet waste targets.

Scottish Government zero waste plan targets are: 70% recycled and maximum 5% sent to landfill by 2025.

The report’s recommendations include reducing the unpredictability of the planning system, unlocking private sector investment through a simple, technology neutral policy framework, consideration of waste developments and local and national levels, and more work to crack down on illegal waste crime.

Launching the report, chairman of the SESA Executive Committee Colin Paterson, said: “SESA supports the new Waste (Scotland) Regulations as a strong foundation for promoting green growth and reducing the carbon emissions associated with managing the economy’s waste.

“Going forward, the role of our industry is to add further value and efficiency by turning more of Scotland’s waste into high quality resources that can be returned back into the productive economy”.

CBI Scotland director Iain McMillan said that Scotland needed a “strong and vibrant” waste management industry capable of delivering high value services to Scotland’s business community.

“However, the success of the Scottish Government’s zero waste agenda will be measured by how efficiently new waste infrastructure can be delivered on the ground,” he said.

We hope you enjoyed the above article. To get unlimited access to all articles on mrw.co.uk you will need to have a paid subscription. Subscribe now save yourself 36% off the standard subscription rate.

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.