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Tap into waste data

With increasing pressure to divert waste from landfill and drive recycling rates ever upwards, accurate reporting of waste tonnages could be the secret of success. That is the view of Moba Mobile Automation, the German waste weighing specialist, making its entry to the UK market with its range of body scales and front- and rear-end loader systems.

Moba’s M-scale transforms RCVs into mobile weighing systems by installing load cells under the vehicle body (pictured), with an in-cab indicator to accurately weigh waste as it is collected.

“There are a few firms in the UK today that really have the market to themselves. Some councils have had waste collection systems installed which have never fully worked properly. We feel from our discussions that the market is looking for something else.”

The €50m (£43.6m) turnover Moba group has been operating in Europe for 20 years. It also has a construction division that develops levellers, graders and pavers. Although Moba’s construction arm is currently larger than its waste division in the UK, this is something Moba UK sales director Ian Lewis believes will soon change.

He says: “[The M-scale system] provides a lot of efficiencies and options. We have been involved in the European market for 20 years. Now it is about helping the UK to recognise the benefits.”

Moba technology also lends itself to industrial bin collections thanks to the Cias industrial waste weighing system, which places the load cells within the front or rear lifter instead of the under-body and installs transponders in bins.

Lewis says: “Customers sometimes do not believe how much they have collected. By the time they get to the weighbridge, there is the assumption they could have added someone else’s waste on to it - they would not have a clue who was paying for what.”

Moba also produces Mawis, a software interface for bin management and route planning, which offers complete accuracy in the collection of local authority and commercial bins.

“Local authorities are looking for green waste collections, so they want to have a referencing system to see what their green waste collection is and to make sure they are meeting targets,” Lewis says. “This technology is designed for servicing and reporting the efficiency of waste collection.

“How else do you prove you are collecting the right waste? You can go to the weighbridge site, but what is it you are unloading on to the weighbridge? How much is green waste and how much is residual waste?”

The company’s on-board computer for collection data recording and transfer, as well as in-bin trans-ponders, can also help commercial waste collection operators to improve the efficiencies of their services. Lewis says: “We can set up our in-cab system with a white and black list with full route optimisation based on the information [from head office]. In simple terms, the system will read the bin’s transponder and advise the driver if the bin is to be collected or not from that business.”

With applications for commercial, industrial and municipal waste collections, Moba UK is focusing its attentions on body and lifter manufacturers, councils and both established and smaller waste management companies. Lewis says: “There are a few firms in the UK today that really have the market to themselves. Some councils have had waste collection systems installed which have never fully worked properly. We feel from our discussions that the market is looking for something else.”

Although the German company’s weighing systems have been developed with a view to charging customers for their waste, something the Government has withdrawn from UK legislation, Lewis believes there are still things to be learned from Europe.

“We need to educate ourselves more on what waste is and what we do with it, because we certainly have to become greener,” he says. “If you go to a street in Barcelona or Frankfurt, there can be three bins for each individual address. They are much more switched on than us with regards to economic policy for waste collection and payment services.”

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