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Resources and waste strategy to tackle crime and fly-tipping

Resources minister Therese Coffey has said there will be a review of the waste carriers, brokers and dealers regime as part of a waste strategy due next year.

Speaking at the House of Commons on a debate on fly-tipping, Coffey said the Government would conduct the review to “ensure those who are part of that trade fully understand their duties and responsibilities and do not fly-tip waste while acting under the veil of legitimacy”.

She added: “We will explore how extended producer responsibility might help to decrease fly-tipping, and we are absolutely clear that we want to enforce appropriately the regulations on waste electrical and electronic equipment.”

Plans for a resources and waste strategy were announced in October, with a commitment to “to make the UK a world leader in terms of competitiveness, resource productivity and resource efficiency”.

The debate was brought by Anne Marie Morris, the Newton Abbott MP, who called for a review into local authority charges at household waste and recycling centres (HWRCs).

She said: “It seems to me that we have effectively incentivised the individual householder to fly-tip, or to employ a third party to fly-tip for them, and we have incentivised the man with a van who might do furniture removals and so on to offer tip services, but then he does not get a licence and instead dumps on highways, woodland and farmland. It just does not work.”

In response, Coffey said she was aware of claims that charges lead to greater fly-tipping.

“Although I recognise the anecdotal reports suggesting the connection and fully understand them, the evidence that has been gathered thus far is inconclusive,” she added.

“I am keen that this is explored further, and my officials are working with WRAP to better understand the connection between changes at HWRCs and fly-tipping of waste.

“I can assure her that WRAP is reviewing its existing guidance on HWRCs by the end of this year to ensure it reflects changes made in the law and to give further guidance on what can be charged for by way of non-household wastes.”

Readers' comments (1)

  • "I can assure her that WRAP is reviewing its existing guidance on HWRCs by the end of this year to ensure it reflects changes made in the law and to give further guidance on what can be charged for by way of non-household wastes.”

    This makes no sense as the law makes it clear that construction waste from any source (i.e. therefore including DIY waste) is industrial not domestic waste and therefore Councils can charge for it at their sites.

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